WHAT DO OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT CROP INSURANCE?

 

“Crop insurance is a total protection plan for our food supply,” he said. “If you lose your farmers, you lose your food. It’s that simple.”
-Jeff Coke, farmer, Owensboro, Kentucky


The House and Senate bills both maintain “the highest priority of our farmers and that is the maintenance of a good crop insurance program. I heard it at every town hall, every forum, and every conversation with a farmer.”
–Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-ND)


As a member of the House Ag committee, I also understand the necessity of this bill in strengthening several key provisions. This includes protecting crop insurance….”
–Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-IL)


“Farm country needs a multi-year bill that protects crop insurance, tightens the safety net, opens markets, and makes responsible investments in our communities.”
–Rep. Roger Marshall (R-KS)


“We’ve protected a strong safety net by maintaining a crop insurance program that will allow producers to stay competitive and be more innovative.”
–Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA)


“We both start out recognizing that crop insurance is number one, right? So we maintain crop insurance. That’s our number one risk management tool for our farmers on the safety net.”
–Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND)


“We can all agree that our farmers should have robust risk management tools, including strong crop insurance assistance and new tools for our dairy farmers who’ve been struggling. … I do not believe these critical programs should be targeted for cuts.”
–Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)


“There are a few misconceptions out there about crop insurance, which have become especially widespread during the ongoing Farm Bill negotiations. But let’s be clear: Crop insurance is not a handout.”
–Jeremy Hinton, farmer and crop insurance agent, Hodgenville, Kentucky


“If we didn’t have (crop) insurance, we would be in a world of hurt. Not only do we depend on that to pay for our expenses, but we have seven other employees that work for us.”
–Brad Rock, Farmer, Wray, Colorado


“Thankfully, today we do have some tools in place to help deal these types of weather-related risks. One of the most important tools is an efficient crop insurance program for our nation’s farmers and ranchers.”
–Steve Wooten, Rancher, Kim, Colorado


“I’m looking forward to working with Congress to pass the Farm Bill on time so that it delivers for all (farmers). And I support a bill that includes crop insurance.”
— President Donald Trump


“Ultimately, reduced participation in crop insurance because of any type of arbitrary means testing can only lead to an increase in calls for off-budget, ad hoc disaster assistance when devastation occurs.”
— Ron Rutledge, president and CEO, Farmers Mutual Hail Insurance Company of Iowa


“It’s an honor to grow food for America and the world. But it’s also much riskier than a paycheck from an employer, like when I worked as an engineer. Crop insurance for me, as a young producer, is a critical risk management tool.”
— Brian Martin, Missouri farmer


“The cornerstone of the 2014 farm bill was crop insurance. Our first need and want [in the next Farm Bill] is to maintain that support of our crop insurance program, to make sure our farmers have that risk management tool.”
— Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation


“It is very misleading to consider federal crop insurance a hand-out when its purpose is to provide a risk management tool when unforeseeable conditions arise.”
— Ben Adams, farmer and president of the Washington Association of Wheat Growers


“Earlier this year, within a short span, my crop was impacted by a late season blizzard, disease, and a hail storm. Crop insurance didn’t allow me to make a profit, but rather recover some of my loss and enabled me to farm another year.”
— David Schemm, Kansas farmer and president of National Association of Wheat Growers


“Farm policy critics would do well to remember that every American consumer relies on agriculture. We all want healthy, fresh food for our families. We also want affordable food. In today’s difficult farm economy, crop insurance provides an important measure of stability.”
— Dorian Culver, Missouri soybean farmer and crop insurance agent


“Our farmers want to be out in the field planting the crops and harvesting them to sell at market for a reasonable price. The best way to give them the chance to do that is to keep crop insurance affordable and widely available in the next Farm Bill.”
— G. Bradford Reeves, Maryland crop insurance agent


“Even the best-laid plans sometimes go wrong. No one knows this more than a farmer. … This is why most farmers purchase crop insurance. It is the one part of the plan that holds together in a crisis. It is a tool that farmers rely upon when things go awry.”
— Luke Sandrock, Illinois crop insurance agent


“Crop insurance is so vital to this state; so vital to every crop in (Texas). Whether it be corn, wheat, or cotton – all of the crops come very much into play when it comes to crop insurance.”
— Russell Boening, president, Texas Farm Bureau


“Farmers, ag leaders, equipment dealers – everyone involved in agriculture – agrees that crop insurance should remain a viable and affordable tool for managing risk.”
— Richard Gaona, president, Rolling Plains Cotton Growers


“How can I and my fellow farmers stay in business? Number 1 (priority) is crop insurance. … Crop insurance is indispensable.”
— Ben Scholz, National Association of Wheat Growers


“With more frequent and intense weather patterns, rising interest rates and production costs and lower commodity prices, our risk has gone up while our balance sheets have gone down. We simply have to have affordable crop insurance to manage those risks.”
— Kyle Peterson, chairman, Southern Minnesota Beet Sugar Cooperative


“Farmers borrow more in one year to produce a crop than most Americans do in a lifetime. Our growers, and our bankers, need strong risk management tools like crop insurance that are essential in order to secure operating loans to grow our crop.”
— Kyle Peterson, chairman, Southern Minnesota Beet Sugar Cooperative


“When there’s a crop loss, there’s going to be a loss of income on the farm but with a good crop insurance program, and working capital, we may help them farm another year.”
— Howard Olsen, AgCountry Farm Credit Services


“I was involved in a hailstorm this year where we lost the corn and the bean crop on one farm. With crop insurance, we’re not going to make any money at that this year, but I am going to be able to farm again next year because of risk management tools.”
— Kevin Paap, president, Minnesota Farm Bureau


“Crop insurance – please protect it. Crop insurance is so vitally important. … It is a key component to obtaining credit.”
— Bruce Peterson, Minnesota Corn Growers


“Crop insurance is so important to me. We have three families directly that drive income from our farm and if we did not have crop insurance we would not be able to survive.”
— Noah Hultgren, Minnesota Corn Growers


“I can assure you (crop insurance) has become a critical tool that is equally as important as the amazing technological advancements that have made our farms the most efficient and productive in the world.”
— Rex Williamson, Ohio crop insurance agent


“When producers put seeds in the ground, they do not expect a hail storm to hit right as they are ready to harvest their crops. They would much rather reap the benefits of their hard work in the marketplace than receive an indemnity.”
— Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Chairman Pat Roberts (R-KS)


“We are not going to cut crop insurance. Period.”
— Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Chairman Pat Roberts (R-KS)


“I have fought to expand and strengthen crop insurance for all farmers, from expanding coverage to specialty crop growers, organic producers, and beginning farmers, to providing a whole-farm option for diversified farms.”
— Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Ranking Democrat Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)


“Without crop insurance and commodity title payments, the financial wherewithal of [family] farms would likely face serious erosion in the current environment.”
— Bruce Rohwer, National Corn Growers Association board member


“The federal crop insurance program has been and continues to be farmers’ most important risk management tool. A farmer might go many years paying premiums for a policy and rarely get an indemnity.”
— David Schemm, president of the National Association of Wheat Growers


“You could take [farmers out] of the risk pool…and that policy wouldn’t even be viable potentially to be offered to the rest of the farmers who need it.”
— Rodney Weinzierl, executive director of the Illinois Corn Growers Association


“American farmers are the most efficient in the world, but we need strong farm policies that give us the right tools, like reliable credit and a vibrant crop insurance program, in order to keep meeting our growing global food, fiber and energy needs.”
— Jimmy Dodson, chairman of the Farm Credit Bank of Texas


“Crop insurance works well because it is a tool available to farmers of all sizes in all geographic regions. Congress should not upset this delicate balance by discriminating against one group of growers and weakening their ability to manage risk.”
— Bill Pearson, Iowa crop insurance agent


“Sometimes folks are quick to criticize crop insurance because they don’t realize that, like agriculture, the program touches every state in the nation. It has proven itself to be our most effective risk-management tool.”
— Steve Van Voorhis,  New York crop insurance agent and farmer


“No crop insurance program will make a grower devastated by a natural disaster financially ‘whole’ but it will allow them to survive a devastating loss and continue to support the economic engine of rural America.”
— Chris Alpers, Redpath Orchards


“Programs like crop insurance, livestock gross margin insurance, and FSA guarantees are essential to maintain a stable and secure food system. Overall, net farm income was down nearly 50 percent from 2013 to 2016, and if net farm income continues to fall, the risk management programs may be the only remaining safeguard.”
— Andy Snider, owner, Snider Farms, Michigan


“Prices are also low today, but modern crop insurance takes the fear out of farming. No wonder crop insurance is the top policy priority for most farmers in this upcoming farm bill.”
— Jim Obermiller, Nebraska farmer


“It is in times like these that risk management tools, including Title I commodity programs and federal crop insurance, need to kick in to provide the safety net they were designed to deliver.”
— Jackie McClaskey, Kansas Secretary of Agriculture


“Without question, the most important USDA program is federal crop insurance. Crop insurance offers risk protection to many agricultural commodities and when disaster strikes, the indemnity check is in our bank account much sooner than any other USDA program.”
— Amy France, Kansas Farm Bureau


“Federal crop insurance provides an effective risk management tool to farmers and ranchers of all sizes when they are facing losses beyond their control, reduces taxpayer risk exposure, makes hedging possible to help mitigate market volatility and provides lenders with greater certainty that loans made to producers will be repaid.”
— Tom Lahey, vice president, Kansas Cotton Association


“When a natural disaster looms on the horizon, whether it is a drought, flood, hail storm, or in my case, a tornado, we know that crop insurance will help keep us in business.”
— Kenneth Wood, president of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers


“I wonder if anyone understands the need for a solid crop insurance program more than the Kansas farmer. Drought, hail, wind and floods can ravage farms and sometimes Kansas farmers can experience all of these disasters in the same year. Unlike car insurance, crop insurance protects us against systemic risk.
— Kent Moore, Kansas Corn Growers Association


“Put simply, crop insurance is working. For every farmer, banker, and rural businessman I talk to, they all remind me that crop insurance is the cornerstone of the farm safety net.”
— House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway (R-Tex.)


“All of us know…we have to protect crop insurance—it’s the Number One tool in the risk management toolbox that farmers must have. It’s a great program and it’s terribly important.”
— Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.)


“If you have a hurricane, a flood, tornadoes—all the natural disasters you can have—when the federal government comes in…it’s 100% paid by taxpayers.  But with crop insurance, the farmers are paying into it, and you are buying ahead and you are trying to manage your risk.”
— Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa)


“We desperately want to be able to feed America … and crop insurance is … one of the tools they have to do that.”
— Kay Rentzel, National Peach Council


“In the highly uncertain business of farming, any certainty we can get is of tremendous value to us.”
— Dan Atkisson, National Sorghum Producers


“Annual losses incurred by farmers clearly demonstrate the need for crop insurance protection and the public-private partnership of program delivery. …”
— Ronnie Lee, Chairman, National Cotton Council


“Prior to a viable crop insurance program we did have a lot of ad hoc disaster assistance …”
— Chuck Conner, National Council of Farmer Cooperatives


“To me, I think the American taxpayer gets a good value (with crop insurance). And hopefully we can work together… to make sure that the crop insurance program is sound, solid and a good economic value not only for producers but the taxpayer as well.”
—  Sonny Perdue, Secretary of Agriculture


“(Crop insurance) is vital to farmers … they need that safety net of both the risk of production and pricing … and I hope that we can even continue that and enhance that.”
— Sonny Perdue, Secretary of Agriculture


“Without question, the most important USDA program is federal crop insurance, and I’m not alone in that belief. Crop insurance offers risk protection to many agricultural commodities.”
Amy France, Kansas Farm Bureau


“When a natural disaster looms on the horizon, whether it is a drought, flood, hail storm, or in my case, a tornado, we know that crop insurance will help keep us in business.”
Kenneth Wood, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers


“I wonder if anyone understands the need for a solid crop insurance program more than the Kansas farmer. Drought, hail, wind and floods can ravage farms and sometimes Kansas farmers can experience all of these disasters in the same year.”
Kent Moore, Kansas Corn Growers Association


“(Crop insurance) is vital to farmers … that need that safety net of both the risk of production and pricing … and I hope that we can even continue that and enhance that.”
Sonny Perdue, Secretary of Agriculture


“To me, I think the American taxpayer gets a good value (with crop insurance). And hopefully we can work together… to make sure that the crop insurance program is sound, solid and a good economic value not only for producers but the taxpayer as well.”
Sonny Perdue, Secretary of Agriculture


“Prior to a viable crop insurance program we did have a lot of ad hoc disaster assistance that was very, very difficult for members of Congress to deal with.”
–- Chuck Conner, National Council of Farmer Cooperatives


“One of the big misconceptions is the fact that (crop insurance) is a program that is somehow limited to the middle of the country… part of the struggle here is to make sure folks recognize the diversity of support, where the support is located and that it is nationwide.
–- Rob Larew, National Farmers Union


“I think the crop insurance program has been a pretty incredible program. It’s worked really well.”
-– Mary Kay Thatcher, American Farm Bureau Federation


“We must continue a crop insurance program, expand trade opportunities overseas and rebuild rural infrastructure.”
-– Todd Vanhoose, Farm Credit Council


“NCGA believes that for the corn farmer who faces a high level of financial and production risks every year, (investments in new technology and more modern production practices) were made possible by a farm safety net that offers sound risk management tools and a costshare federal crop insurance program that serves as the foundation.”
-– Wesley Spurlock, National Corn Growers Association


“ASA’s recommendations for the 2018 Farm Bill begin with the need to maintain the current crop insurance program as the core risk management tool for producers of soybeans and other crops. … Crop insurance isn’t broken, and it doesn’t need to be fixed.”
-– Ron Moore, American Soybean Association


“Each year there will inevitably be producers in some part of the country that experience weather conditions outside of their control that could take out their crop. Crop insurance is critically important to enable a producer to farm another year after such an experience.”
-– David Schemm, National Association of Wheat Growers


“In the highly uncertain business of farming, any certainty we can get is of tremendous value to us. This is also why crop insurance is so valuable –because of its rock-solid certainty.”
–- Dan Atkisson, National Sorghum Producers


“Annual losses incurred by farmers clearly demonstrate the need for crop insurance protection and the public-private partnership of program delivery. Farmers, their lenders, input suppliers and other stakeholders agree that crop insurance protection should remain a viable, affordable tool for managing risk.”
Ronnie Lee Chairman National Cotton Council​​


“No crop insurance program will make a grower devastated by a natural disaster financially ‘whole’ but it will allow them to survive a devastating loss and continue to support the economic engine of Rural America.”
Chris Alpers, Redpath Orchards


“Programs like crop insurance, livestock gross margin insurance, and FSA guarantees, are essential to maintain a stable and secure food system. Overall, net farm income was down nearly 50 percent from 2013 to 2016, and if net farm income continues to fall, the risk management programs may be the only remaining safeguard.”
Andy Snider, the senior partner/owner of Snider Farms


“Crop insurance is something you hope you never have to use. It doesn’t pay for the total cost of planting a crop of wheat. But it will keep farmers in business for the next season – and that’s the whole point of a safety net.”
David Schemm, president of the National Wheat Growers Association


“Prices are also low today, but modern crop insurance takes the fear out of farming. No wonder crop insurance is the top policy priority for most farmers in this upcoming farm bill.”
Jim Obermiller, farmer, Loup City, Nebraska


“As is the case with other insurance policies, we purchase crop insurance in the hope that we never have to use it. And, when disaster strikes, we use the policy to pay our bills. It isn’t close to what we would collect from a healthy crop, but it allows us to keep farming.”
Nicole Berg of Berg Farms, Paterson, Washington


“We purchase crop insurance for our family farm every year and have never filed a major claim. But that’s hardly the point. Like our fellow farmers, we purchase crop insurance for the same reasons we purchase home insurance or car insurance — with the hope we’ll never need it. But we’ll keep purchasing it every year because some day we might.”
Scott VanderWal, third-generation family farmer, Volga, South Dakota


“It’s a big concern of mine that there is a constant need to defend crop insurance against the myths and outright lies that these special interest groups spread in Washington and beyond. And, frankly, sometimes, I’m amazed that there is so much debate in Congress about the small investment in crop insurance and farm policy, considering the return for every American.”
Jeremy Brown, farmer, Lubbock, Texas


“Operating loans are essential for every farmer because of the cost of producing crops, but for my family they have enabled us to keep going to the next year despite depressed yields and prices, and in some cases the inability to plant a crop at all. And we would not be able to receive this crucial financing without crop insurance and farm policy in place.”
Lorraine Greco, organic rice farmer, Sacramento Valley, California


“Crop insurance and farm policy enables everyone – from the farmer to the banker to the taxpayer – to plan for those disasters and overcome them when they happen. If lawmakers continue to try and chip away at this safety net, farmers will not have the ability to survive. This is especially true for young, beginning farmers who have less access to credit and capital.”
Larry Kummer, Market President for the Northeast Indiana Horizon Bank.


“Needless to say, if we hadn’t purchased crop insurance our first year of farming, my cousin and I would be spending years paying off that production loan. And without this valuable risk management tool available, I’d venture to say many more of America’s farmers would have been joining us.”
Scott Reilly, farmer and crop insurance agent, Spalding, Nebraska


“My wife and I have risked our livelihood to maintain the farm for our children and grandchildren, just as my parents and grandparents did for us. Without crop insurance, we would have to quit farming.”
Darrell Crapp, farmer, Lancaster, Wisconsin


“Farmers are the engines that drive the economy of rural America, and without a sufficient safety net in place – like crop insurance – that entire equation is at risk.”
Tom Gillis, president, Wisconsin Corn Growers Association


“Statistics already show us that farming is a hard life with fewer and fewer people willing to try it. Now is not the time to make starting a farm even more difficult by destroying the viability and affordability of crop insurance.”
Joe Kessie, senior vice president and commercial south regional manager, Lake City Bank, Warsaw, Indiana


“Clearly, the success behind crop insurance is that it’s affordable, viable, and available. Unlike other forms of insurance, any farmer who wishes to purchase crop insurance can do so, regardless of the size of their farming operation or how many years they may have under their belts farming.”
Todd Snider, crop insurance agent, Bakersfield, California


“Don’t let anyone tell you anything differently: Affordable, available and viable crop insurance is essential for a healthy farm sector and plentiful, domestic food supply.
John Michael Pillow, farmer, Yazoo City, Mississippi